• You’ve likely heard about the legislature’s new gas tax proposal, which seeks to raise over $4 billion to “solve” our infrastructure needs. This massive proposal includes new charges at the gas pump, on delivery services like Amazon, ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft, and more.   No matter who you are, they have a new charge for you.

    We all agree that our roads and bridges need repair, but Coloradans already pay 22 cents per gallon in State taxes, on top of the 18.4 cents we pay in federal taxes. For certain politicians that’s just not enough.

    Much of the debate has focused on the questionable legality of the proposal, due to the passage of Proposition 117 just this past November.  That requires governments to receive voter approval before enacting these types of new, large “fees.” The unique protections of our Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights, require the legislature to obtain voter approval before raising taxes. But sponsors won’t let that stop them. Instead, they’re calling these new taxes, “fees,”’ so that Colorado voters won’t have a voice in the process. Read more …

  • April 16, 2021 By Michael Fields

    A week after the November 2020 election, I wrote a column saying that Republicans need to develop a “Contract with Colorado” based on conservative policy proposals that 55% or more of voters support. I said, “Republicans have an opportunity over the next two years to set a clear agenda and articulate it to voters.”

    After doing extensive statewide polling, certain themes really stood out. Coloradans want every citizen of our state to be allowed to flourish. They have strong opinions on issues – but want politicians to treat each other with respect and work to find common ground when they can. They are also concerned about the economy and the rising cost of living.

    In order to address some of the big issues that Coloradans care about, here are 10 ideas for the GOP to fully embrace:

    1. Continue to protect our Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights(TABOR). Few things are more popular than people being allowed to vote on any tax (or large fee) increase.
    2. Lower taxes. Coloradans overwhelmingly support a property tax cut for both residential and commercial property. With housing costs on the rise, low-income families would especially benefit from this tax cut.

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

  • What happened when an energy CEO tried to order employee Christmas gifts.

    By James Freeman

    April 16, 2021 4:46 pm ET


    PHOTO: NICK OXFORD/REUTERS

    Tired of misleading and hypocritical virtue signalling about “sustainable” business practices? Today let’s celebrate a CEO who decided to challenge trendy corporate wisdom about fossil fuels and explain the virtues of low-cost energy. Four months after publishing a few truths that are highly inconvenient to the environmental lobby, Innovex Downhole Solutions CEO Adam Anderson says that “the reaction has been overwhelming.”

    The energy services entrepreneur appeared this morning on the Fox Business Network with Maria Bartiromo (co-author of a book with your humble correspondent) and reported that his message has been resonating with people inside and outside his industry. “I’m very passionate about the oil and gas business and the good—the virtue of the business—and how it helps human prosperity and flourishing around the world,” he said.

    The story began last year when Mr. Anderson wanted to get each of his roughly 400 employees a nice Christmas gift at the end of a very tough 2020. He settled on the idea of some high-quality outdoor apparel, customized with the logo of his Houston-based oilfield services company. But the potential vendor wasn’t as enthusiastic.

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

  • P.T. Barnum once said, “There’s no such thing as bad publicity,” which is almost as good as Oscar Wilde’s version, who put it like this: “There’s only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about.”

    Both men could turn a phrase, and both men had a point.

    With Discovery premiering Six Degrees this Sunday at 10 PM, you’d think that any surrounding press would be a good thing.

    But neither Barnum or Wilde lived in these extraordinary times, where anyone can post anything from anywhere, and reach millions of people anytime. Many of you have called the attached article to my attention, along with a very misleading headline I would have ignored, once upon a time, but cannot, in this day and age.

    Here’s a link to the original article, if you’re interested. https://bit.ly/3wNrkGc

    Or, if you prefer, you can scroll down and enjoy the same copy, along with my gentle attempts to set the record straight.

    Either way, better strap in. This one’s a doozy…

    Read more …

  • Americans for Prosperity free gas
    The conservative organization Americans for Prosperity is kicking off a month-long campaign that means free gas for five Coloradans picked at random.

    As it ramps up to fight legislation to put more fees on gas, diesel, vehicles, ride sharing and deliveries, Americans for Prosperity is offering an appropriate prize: $200 in fuel to each of five lucky Colorado drivers.

    Jesse Mallory, the conservative organization’s state director and the former chief of staff to the state Senate Republicans, announced the giveaway Tuesday afternoon.

    “While legislators have been hard at work trying to find ways to make Coloradans pay more at the pump, we’ve been spending time looking for ways to help struggling families,” he said. “We decided to offer $200 gas cards to five families to help pay for the legislature’s gas tax proposal.”

    To continue reading this story and register for free gasoline, click (HERE):

  • A week after this last election, I wrote a column saying that Republicans need to develop a “Contract with Colorado” based on conservative policy proposals that 55% or more of voters support. I said, “Republicans have an opportunity over the next two years to set a clear agenda and articulate it to voters.”

    After doing extensive statewide polling, certain themes really stood out. Coloradans want every citizen of our state to be allowed to flourish. They have strong opinions on issues – but want politicians to treat each other with respect and work to find common ground when they can. They are also concerned about the economy and the rising cost of living.

    In order to address some of the big issues that Coloradans care about, here are 10 ideas for the GOP to fully embrace:

    1. Continue to protect our Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights. Few things are more popular than people being allowed to vote on any tax (or large fee) increase.

    2. Lower taxes. Coloradans overwhelmingly support a property tax cut for both residential and commercial property. With housing costs on the rise, low-income families would especially benefit from this tax cut.

    To continue reading the rest of this article, please click (HERE):

  • Every issue is an excuse to expand the size and scope of government and implement trillions in new taxes

    If your only tool is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

    For Democrats today, the solution for every new issue is another tax increase. Name the “problem” and their “solution” is a higher tax on American families and businesses.

    Every issue is an excuse to expand the size and scope of government and implement trillions in new taxes.

    Even in the recent $1.9 trillion COVID “relief” spending spree legislation, Democrats put in a proviso that they believe will stop any tax reduction by Republican-led state governments for the next four years: If a state cuts taxes the Biden administration will threaten to sue to get their “bailout money” back.

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

  • For almost three decades, TABOR has been a godsend for Colorado taxpayers.

    2:55 AM MST on Jan 24, 2021

    Colorado’s Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights is under attack once again, this time by the very politicians whose actions TABOR is intended to check.

    A lawsuit filed by state legislators and some local elected officials has been wending its way through the federal courts since 2011. They seek to overturn the voter-enacted TABOR amendment to the Colorado constitution, which requires voter approval before state and local legislative bodies can impose or raise taxes.

    The lawmakers’ case rests on the dubious idea that by denying legislators a free hand on matters of taxing and spending, TABOR denies Coloradans a republican form of government, in violation of the U.S. Constitution.

    It’s a specious, self-serving argument that ignores more than a century of case law and practical political experience with voter initiatives and referendums, in Colorado and elsewhere.

    The case will now be heard by the entire U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, although it seems likely that the U.S. Supreme Court will eventually get the final word.

    It’s a complicated case involving questions of standing — who has the right to bring a case to court — and whether constitutional guarantees of a republican form of government include the actions of political subdivisions such as school boards.

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

  • Colorado cooperates with other states to avoid a long, unpredictable Supreme Court battle. But if we cooperate and Arizona doesn’t, we may continue to lose.

    Ed Millard

    3:00 AM MST on Jan 24, 2021

    The Glen Canyon Dam at Lake Powell in Page, Arizona. (Jesse Paul, The Colorado Sun)

    The Colorado River is under stress today due to rising temperatures and declining streamflows, as described in a Dec. 13 Colorado Sun opinion essay by Russell George and John Stulp. The other cause, seldom mentioned, is a water war among seven states, Mexico and the federal government — a war Colorado has been losing.

    The 1922 Colorado River Compact called for dividing the river’s water equally between the Upper Basin (Colorado, northwestern New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming and far northeastern Arizona) and the Lower Basin (California, Nevada, the rest of Arizona, southwestern Utah and western New Mexico). In the compact, each basin was promised 7.5 million acre-feet of water each year. (An acre-foot is 325,851 gallons, enough to cover an acre, about the size of a football field, 12 inches deep.)

    At the last minute, Arizona demanded exclusive use of water from the Gila River, which flows from New Mexico across Arizona to the Colorado River at Yuma. In 1945, a treaty with Mexico further unbalanced the deal. There’s more information here.

    Today, the Upper Basin states use only a quarter of the river’s water, while the Lower Basin states use more than double that. Add in Mexico, which has been allocated 1.5 million acre-feet, and the Lower Basin uses two thirds of the river. The Upper Basin, including Colorado, has already surrendered 3 million acre-feet of our compact entitlement, our water right, to the Lower Basin to deal with this over-allocation.

    To continue reading this article, please click (HERE):

     

     

     

     

     

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