• Colorado’s Unaffiliated Voters May Receive Two Ballots for June Primary Election

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    Published Saturday, April 7, 2018
    PICT - Kiowa County Press Icon
    by Chris Sorensen

    Unaffiliated voters across Colorado may soon receive ballots for both the Republican and Democrat parties for the June primary election.

    Proposition 108, passed by Colorado voters in 2016, allows voters who have not opted to affiliate with either of the two major political parties to vote in either – but not both – primary elections later this year. In the past, unaffiliated voters were required to join one of the parties in order to vote in the primary, though they had the option to return to unaffiliated status or switch to another party following the election.

    Read more …

  • Campaign urges unaffiliated voters to participate in primaries

    Secretary of State launches UChooseCO

    By Jeff RiceJournal-Advocate Staff Writer

    POSTED:   04/05/2018 04:42:52 PM MDT

     

    Secretary of State Wayne Williams writes "Community" on a huge inflatable U during an appearance in Grand Junction to urge unaffiliated voters to

    Secretary of State Wayne Williams writes “Community” on a huge inflatable U during an appearance in Grand Junction to urge unaffiliated voters to participate in the June 26 primary elections. (Courtesy photo / Colorado Secretary of State)

    Logan County’s unaffiliated registered voters can express a preference for participating in either the Republican or Democratic primaries on June 26, but the cannot vote in both.

    Wayne Williams, Colorado’s secretary of state, completed a three-city tour this week called the UChooseCO campaign emphasizing the fact that the state’s new voting law allows unaffiliated voters to participate in one of the primary elections.

    That’s important in counties like Logan, where unaffiliated voters outnumber registered Democrats as the second-largest group of registered voters. According to Logan County Clerk and Recorder Pam Bacon, Logan County has 5,722 Republicans, 3,432 unaffiliated and 1,725 Democrats registered to vote. There are 143 voters registered to one of the minor parties for a total of 11,022 registered voters in Logan County.

    Read more …

  • How many unaffiliated voters might vote in Colorado’s 2018 party primaries?

    We won’t know until June 26. But we might have a small snapshot from a new survey.

    How many unaffiliated voters might vote in Colorado’s 2018 party primaries?As if the 2018 race for Colorado governor wasn’t already a fascinating affair given the number of candidates running, a new twist this year makes it even more of a unicorn.

    For the first time, the state’s 1.2 million unaffiliated voters will be allowed to help choose the Democratic and Republican nominee.

    Unless they proactively ask for a particular party’s ballot from the Secretary of State’s office, each independent voter will be mailed a ballot for both parties in the weeks before the June 26 primary, though they can only choose one.

    A big question for political observers this year is how many of these party buckers will actually vote. Another is which party the majority of them will choose, and a third is how their influence might affect the outcome.

    A new poll conducted for the Secretary of State’s Office by the Republican-leaning Colorado-based Magellan Strategies firm, gives us an early snapshot, albeit with a caveat.

    Read more …

  • Karen is currently advocating for “strategic voting” in the upcoming primary. Also known as “Prop 108 Revolt” or the “Kataline Conspiracy,” here’s the idea:  

    Those who wish to, can help all Republicans in the general  election by voting for the weakest Democrat candidate in the primary.

    Karen has strong opinions about who those candidates might be and will lead a discussion with NSRF members about it.  There will be lots of time for Q&A during the meeting.

     This is a superb year for Republicans to play from the deck Democrats keep stacking. They also ought to be shown the consequences when their tactics are played on them.

    With the passing of Prop. 108, it’s easy to change party affiliation online. This year, the deadline is May 29.  It’s just as easy to change it back for the general election.

     Learn about “The Kataline Conspiracy” at the NSRF’s May 12th meeting from 9:00am-11:00am.  We meet at Amazing Grace Community Church’s meeting room, 541 E 99th Place in Thornton.  Admission is $5 and  includes a continental breakfast.

     

  • The question is why this high-energy president seems to have fallen for the media claim that his only proactive course is to fire Mr. Mueller. It isn’t. There are two very bold actions the Trump White House could take to reset the Russia dynamic. Both would aid Mr. Trump’s presidency and serve the executive branch and the public in the longer term.

    The first is an abrupt overhaul of the president’s legal team and strategy. Mr. Trump has talented lawyers, but not ones skilled at confronting the threat at hand. They continue to fret over his personal liability, when the real threat is to the Constitution—to this presidency and every future one. Mr. Mueller is by all accounts now focused on obstruction of justice. Mr. Trump needs constitutional powerhouses who can swiftly take that issue off the table.

    Read more …

  • Pelosi: “I Don’t See Anything Inappropriate” In Rigging Primaries

    The Intercept has published a secretly taped audio recording of one of the most powerful Democrats in America pressuring a progressive candidate to drop out of a Colorado congressional primary race. It hasn’t been getting as much attention as the WikiLeaks drops on the DNC’s sabotage of the Sanders campaign because it’s not about a presidential race, but make no mistake: this is the single most damning piece of evidence ever published exposing the Democratic Party’s war on progressives.

    The recording features House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, the second-highest ranking Democrat in the House of Representatives, informing primary challenger Levi Tillemann that if he runs, he will be running against not just the chosen establishment candidate Jason Crow, but against Hoyer and the full might of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) as well.

    “Which means effectively, Congressman Hoyer,” Tillemann is heard saying toward the end of the recording, “I’m running a campaign against Crow, and against you, and against the DCCC, because you guys are on Crow’s side.”

    “Yeah,” replied Hoyer. “You know, frankly, that happens in life all the time.” Read more …

  • Photo courtesy of Amanda Croy

    Colorado’s Gubernatorial Race 2018: The Hot Topics

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    Talking Points

    The topics that will dominate candidates’ messaging throughout the campaign season.

    Growth

    It is the best of times…or is it the worst of times? That depends a lot on how you feel about Colorado’s growth. “Normally, the economy would be the highest issue for most voters,” Paul Teske, a dean at CU Denver, says. “There will be a lot of talk about sustaining the boom.” But, adds DU’s Seth Masket: “There are a lot of different areas of the state that are adversely affected by this growth.” Transportation has become a perennial funding battle at the Capitol and could benefit from strong gubernatorial influence (read: political pressure) to make Republicans and Democrats find bipartisan ways forward. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate in Colorado is three percent (it was 8.9 percent at the end of 2010), which on its face is great news, but that near-full employment causes woes for companies desperate to fill jobs. Wages—particularly in the metro area—haven’t kept up with cost-of-living expenses, which means that although people are finding work, they may not be able to pay bills. And the biggest expense for many voters is rising housing costs. Mix that all together, and the moment is prime for a gubernatorial candidate to stand out by creating a unique vision for Colorado’s future.

    Education

    This may seem like a topic that matters most to people who are raising families, but this year, candidates will compel everyone to think about Colorado’s education system (funding here ranks in the bottom third of all states in the country). Which makes sense: Property owners help pay for schools, employers benefit from a well-prepared workforce, and we all want the best for society’s youngsters, right? But how we ensure we have a strong education system is quite a bit more complicated. Magellan Strategies’ David Flaherty says Republican candidates should be talking about education right now and through November. “It’s the one issue we completely give to the Democrats,” Flaherty says. “It’s unfortunate because it’s one of the top two issues for unaffiliated voters.”

    Tabor

    Conversations about addressing growing pains or giving more money to teachers inevitably evolve into talks about what to do about Colorado’s Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR), which limits government spending to match population growth and inflation increases.

    Under TABOR, which passed in 1992, leftover revenue is returned to the taxpayers. Proponents herald the limits on government spending; detractors warn that TABOR isn’t robust enough to respond to real-time needs, like shifting populations in schools due to high housing costs.

    But Coloradans tend to like the control TABOR gives them: A January 2018 report from the American Politics Research Lab at CU Boulder found that “support among Coloradans outpaces opposition,” with 45 percent of respondents supporting TABOR.

    That number has fallen since 2016, and the study notes that more than a quarter of respondents had “uncertainty about a position.” In short, there’s room for candidates to make TABOR the issue of the campaign.

    Republican candidates are likely to support working within TABOR’s constraints. Democrats will probably talk more about reform or repeal.

    Guns

     

    Read more …

  • From Parkland to Waffle House

    Society ‘dropped the ball’ on Nikolas Cruz and Travis Reinking. A hero picked it up.

    After the shooting in Nashville, April 22.
    After the shooting in Nashville, April 22. PHOTO: MARK HUMPHREY/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    The death toll at a Nashville Waffle House stopped at four because James Shaw pushed back.

    Mr. Shaw ran toward shooter Travis Reinking out of an instinct for self-protection. “I acted in a blink of a second,” he says. “It was like: ‘Do it now. Go now.’ I just took off.”

    He says he’s no hero, but men have been awarded the Medal of Honor for acting on the same blink-of-an-eye instinct. Mr. Shaw is not only a hero, but an object lesson in what America once took for granted but no longer does.

    Over a long time, going back decades, the opposite instinct became the norm in the United States when confronted with threats.

    The threats could be large, like school shootings and terrorism, or they could be small, daily assaults on the most basic civilized orderings of everyday life. Such as 14-year-old girls using four-letter words.

    We used to push back instinctively. Then, we routinely began to step aside.

    The new instinct—don’t do it—happened for all sorts of reasons: You’ll get in trouble with the lawyers. Somebody else is supposed to take care of these things. There must be a better way to understand this problem. Eventually, the simple answer of a James Shaw—“Do it now!”—just died.

    That may be changing. There is evidence that people in positions of social authority are rediscovering the value of pushback.

    On the same day the Waffle House shooting happened, The Wall Street Journal published a story with the headline “Schools Take Zero-Tolerance Approach to Threats After Parkland Shooting.”

    It reported that school officials around the country “are warning parents and students in memos, community meetings and school assemblies that language perceived as threatening, even done in jest, could land younger students in juvenile detention centers and older ones in jail with criminal records.”

    You read that right. Forget the chat in the school counselor’s office. Your next talk will be with the folks at the precinct house. The squad car is waiting at the schoolhouse door.

    A return to the 1940s? We could do worse. And you know that we have when the only solution left is turning schools into armed sentry posts.

    A prosecutor in Macomb County, Mich., said: “If you threaten a school, you are going to be charged.” Beyond common sense, the reason is astonishing: Since the February Parkland shooting, 54 students in Michigan have been charged for making threats against schools.

    Up to now, apparently, you could shoot your mouth off like this—threatening classmates or the entire school—and get off with what in our times has become the one-size-fits-all excuse: “What’s your problem? I was kidding.

    Amy Klinger of the Educator’s School Safety Network told the Journal, “There are kids being arrested today that would have not gotten arrested for the same thing in January. We have come to some sort of place where people realize you can‘t say that stuff.”

    After decades of social mayhem, we have indeed come to some sort of place. Better late than never.

    Pushback is a social virtue. Its utility is a society’s self-preservation. Pushback from people in positions of authority—school principals, university presidents, the cops, parents—has always been the ballast against disorder in a free society.

    If you stepped over a line—and a general consensus once existed on where those lines were—a small personal price was paid, if only in embarrassment for one’s parents. (Please, no false analogies to Maoist social-media shaming.)

    That consensus fell apart. In the 1980s, sophisticates laughed at First Lady Nancy Reagan’s antidrug slogan, “Just say no.” She was defending a broader social attitude. She lost.

    Similarly in schools, the opponents of pushback theory discovered a remarkable weapon: the Supreme Court. Proponents of standing aside turned decades of school disciplinary tradition into constitutional issues. They won.

    In a series of decisions, the justices made the disciplinary authority of principals legally complicated. Fearful of triggering expensive litigation, school authorities pulled back. The environment for learning degraded and remains so to this day in both good and poor public schools.

    The No. 1 reason inner-city parents give for trying to get their children into charter or parochial schools is safety, to escape the chaos and danger of the public schools.

    In 2007 the Supreme Court recognized what had happened, and ruled in the “Bong Hits 4 Jesus” case (Morse v. Frederick) that principals could tell a student advocating illegal drug use near the school to shut up. In his concurrence, Justice Stephen Breyer wrote, “Students will test the limits of acceptable behavior in myriad ways better known to schoolteachers than to judges.” So we learned.

    The phrase used to explain killers Travis Reinking and Nikolas Cruz is that authorities “dropped the ball.” This week, James Shaw picked up the ball inside a Waffle House. It’s time for the people in charge of our institutions to start doing the same thing.

    Write henninger@wsj.com.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/from-parkland-to-waffle-house-1524696345?mod=djemMER

  • TABOR, Colorado education funding and the teacher protests (for Dummies)

    If there’s one thing teachers hate, it’s Cliffnotes, but here’s a “Cliffnotes”-style explainer of the education funding shortfalls Colorado teachers are protesting.

    KUSA – By now, you’ve probably read that thousands of teachers plan to rally at the Colorado State Capitol on Thursday and Friday.

    This has led the state’s largest school districts to cancel class. To put this into perspective, if you got all the kids who will have the day off in the same place, it would be Colorado’s second largest city.

    A stock photo of Colorado Springs, for context.
    RondaKimbrow, RondaKimbrow

    It’s a big deal.

    RELATED | Why thousands of Colorado teachers are protesting on Thursday and Friday

    Education funding in Colorado is confusing, as in the kind of thing that still doesn’t make sense even after spending half of your work day trying to brush up on it (talking from experience here).

    But, like “War and Peace,” your state’s education budget is important … but also super confounding and kinda tedious (apologies to all the Tolstoy fans out there). So, here’s our attempt at a Cliffnotes version to get you up to speed before our coverage of the teacher protests (which is ironic because if there’s one thing teachers hate, it’s using Cliffnotes instead of reading the actual book).

    RELATED | These districts are canceling class on April 27 due to teacher walkouts

    What are the teachers protesting?

    Colorado’s teachers are protesting a few things. First off, they’re speaking out against the state’s lack of education funding (some studies put Colorado in the bottom tier nationwide), low teacher pay (while you’ll see some reports that teacher pay in Colorado is ranked 46th in the country, it’s actually 31st at $52,736 a year, according to the latest National Education Association report) and proposed changes to their pension plan.

    During the protests, there’s one thing hear about a lot: TABOR, and specifically, how it impacts the education budget.

    So … what’s up with TABOR?

    A stock photo of a teacher explaining TABOR.
    Jose Luis Pelaez Inc, This content is subject to copyright.

    No, it’s not someone’s name (necessarily). Instead, it’s an acronym for the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights. This was passed in 1992, and basically, you can trace everything that’s a little unique about Colorado’s budget back to this.

    Read more …

US National Debt Clock

By Eric

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Please join us to discuss current Colorado political issues from The Right Side.

The NSRF meets on the second Saturday of every month from 9:00 am-11:00 am at Amazing Grace Church, 541 E. 99th Place in Thornton . Use the north door to enter. Admission is $5 per person. Coffee, orange juice, bottled water, fruit, & pastries are included with your admission.

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