• OMG….

    So many issues on your November 6th ballot.

    Should you vote YES or NO on each one?

    Is it good, or bad, for Colorado?

    You’ve got questions.

    We’ve got answers.

     

    Join us this Saturday morning, October 13th, for last NSRF meeting before the election.  We meet from 9:00am-11:00am at Amazing Grace Community Church, 541 E 9th Place in Thornton.

    Admission is $5 per person and we include a continental breakfast to go with lively debate.

    We discuss the who/what/where/when/and how about each ballot question.

    See you Saturday morning!

    John Lefebvre, NSRF president

    Here is conservative Ross Kaminsky’s guide to how he sees the ballot questions:

    THE ROSS KAMINSKY SHOW

    Ross’s 2018 Colorado Ballot Measures Voting Guide

    Read more …

  • The Next Kavanaugh Stakes
    PHOTO: JEFF MALET/ZUMA PRESS
    Anyone who thinks the brawl over Brett Kavanaugh and the Supreme Court ended with his confirmation by the Senate on Saturday might want to listen again to Chuck Schumer’s floor speech. The Minority Leader made clear that Democrats are going to use accuser Christine Blasey Ford as a campaign prop from here to November and beyond.
     
    That may have been the Democratic plan all along once they learned of Ms. Ford’s accusation: Hold it for weeks, spring it as close to the election as possible, and if it doesn’t defeat Mr. Kavanaugh then use it to mobilize Democratic turnout. Perhaps that will work, and if it does Democrats will feel their delay-and-destroy strategy was worth it. Republicans should call out this behavior for how Democrats would govern if they take Congress.
     
    ***
    Meantime, Senate Republicans held together and prevented a Supreme Court defeat that would have been a political disaster. Judge—now Justice—Kavanaugh deserves the most credit for refusing to withdraw and fighting for his seat under enormous pressure.
     
    By forcefully defending his integrity and repudiating the Democratic strategy, he gave GOP Senators the confidence to stand with him. He would have been defeated had he played it as meekly as his critics now say in retrospect that he should have. Credit to Donald Trump too for standing by his nominee.

    Read more …

  • A preview of Colorado’s 2018 ballot: Taxes, roads and an existential crisis for oil and gas

    Colorado’s 2018 ballot questions explained, one by one

    PUBLISHED ONOCT 1, 2018 5:05AM MDT

    Brian Eason@brianeason

    Special to The Colorado Sun

    This time two years ago, Colorado voters “raised the bar” in a bid to shrink the state’s ballot and keep potentially devastating policies out of the state constitution.

    Two years later? In the first test of the new requirements, the statewide ballot looks as packed as ever.

    And Colorado political leaders say the stakes are unusually high.

    Voters will have two transportation options to pick from — or three, if you count a legislative proposal that would hit the ballot in 2019 if the two this year fail. There are also two tax hikes on the docket — one for roads, plus one of over $1.6 billion for schools.

    Marijuana is back on the ballot. So are slavery (yes, slavery) and gerrymandering.

    And somehow those aren’t even the most significant ones.

    That title belongs to the one-two punch of a constitutional “takings” measure that could cost state and local governments billions of dollars, and an anti-fracking initiative that Colorado’s oil and gas industry views as an existential crisis.

    Let’s start there:

    Setbacks, and payback

    A resident of a farm near where Crestone Peak Resources proposes to drill 28 wells from property covered by Boulder County conservation easements uses a campaign sign to urge people to vote against Proposition 112. (Dana Coffield, The Colorado Sun) Read more …

  • Colorado’s Fracking Fright

    Proposition 112 would prohibit almost all new oil and gas production.

    A hydraulic fracturing rig is seen in Weld County, Colorado, Feb. 4, 2016.
    A hydraulic fracturing rig is seen in Weld County, Colorado, Feb. 4, 2016. PHOTO: MATTHEW STAVER/BLOOMBERG NEWS

    California normally gets all the attention on the front lines of environmental activism. Gov. Jerry Brown recently signed a bill to “decarbonize” all electricity production by 2045. But in real-world implications for the rest of the country, Colorado also deserves attention. A measure heading for the fall ballot would shut down nearly all oil and gas production in one of the top energy-producing states.
     
    Colorado’s current rules on energy production prohibit oil and gas operations within 500 feet of a home or 1,000 feet of a school or hospital. But an environmental group called Colorado Rising has collected enough signatures for a proposal on the November ballot to expand these buffer zones and effectively create bans in nearly all of the state.
     
    Proposition 112 would restrict new energy development within a 2,500-foot radius of any building, playground, amphitheater, park, body of water or “any other additional vulnerable areas designated by the state or local government.” The restrictions rule out 85% of all non-federal land in the state, according to the Colorado Oil & Gas Conservation Commission. In the five counties that produce 90% to 95% of Colorado’s oil and gas, 94% of non-federal land would be off-limits. The implications of such a ban would be national. Colorado ranks fifth among the states in production of natural gas and seventh for oil.
     
    In the first year the restrictions would take $201 million to $258 million out of state and local tax revenue. As energy production dwindled, that loss could rise to $1.1 billion annually by 2030, according to a Common Sense Policy Roundtable analysis reviewed by faculty from the Colorado School of Mines. The ban could kill up to 147,800 jobs and reduce state GDP by perhaps $218 billion between 2018 and 2030.

    Read more …

  • The GOP Can’t Win for Losing

    A Kavanaugh defeat would demoralize the Republican base, not energize it.

    U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill, Sept. 4.
    U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill, Sept. 4. PHOTO: CHRIS WATTIE/REUTERS

     

    As the battle over Brett Kavanaugh rages on, pundits continue to speculate about what an unproven sexual-misconduct claim might mean for the future makeup of the Supreme Court, for subsequent nominations and for the credibility of the #MeToo movement.

    In the halls of Capitol Hill, the question centers on a much more immediate and political question: the fate of the Republican Party. The overwhelming verdict—on right and left—is that if Judge Kavanaugh goes down, so too does the GOP in the upcoming midterms.

    For now, the distinguished circuit-court judge is on track for confirmation. Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley has handled Christine Blasey Ford’s 36-year-old accusation with enormous accommodation, inviting her to give evidence in any manner of her choosing—a public or private hearing, in Washington or California, in person or over the phone. Her decision to join with partisan Democratic calls for an FBI investigation, and her refusal to provide testimony in any form for a Monday hearing, has troubled Republican senators who insisted she be heard.

    Tennessee’s Bob Corker put the point clearly in a tweet on Monday: “Republicans extended a hand in good faith. If we don’t hear from both sides on Monday, let’s vote.” Even undecided Republican senators understand the Democratic playbook and appreciate how unjust it would be to allow a vague, uncorroborated claim to derail Judge Kavanaugh’s career and reputation—especially if his accuser won’t even put her claims in the Senate record. Read more …

  • What Democrats Have Become

    Brett Kavanaugh is a casualty of an anything-goes political resistance.

    U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill, Sept. 4.
    U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill, Sept. 4. PHOTO: CHRIS WATTIE/REUTERS

    It is still true: What begins as tragedy can end as farce. So it is with the case of Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of assaulting her when she was 15 and he was 17.

    As of the most recent available moment in this episode, Ms. Ford’s lawyer said her client would not appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee until there is a “full investigation by law-enforcement officials.” Like the Mueller excavations, that could run to the horizon, unable to find anything but unwilling to stop until it finds something.

    Let us posit that the one thing not at issue here is the truth. As a matter of law and fact, Ms. Ford’s accusation can be neither proved nor disproved. This is as obvious now as it must have been when Dianne Feinstein and the other Democrats came into possession of this incident.

     

    Read more …

  • Politicizing the FBI

    Democrats want to turn agents into judges of nominee character.

    Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., Sept. 19.
    Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., Sept. 19. PHOTO: ANDREW HARNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Democrats continue to demand an FBI investigation into Christine Blasey Ford’s allegations against Brett Kavanaugh, and on Wednesday we explained their political goal to delay a confirmation vote past Election Day. But it’s worth a moment to point out why this is also an inappropriate, even dangerous, attempt to politicize the bureau.
     
    Democrats want the FBI to “investigate” an alleged assault from 35 or 36 years ago as if it were a federal crime. But the confirmation of a judicial nominee is not a criminal event. It is a political process under which the Senate has the responsibility to exercise its advice and consent power.
     
    The FBI’s role is to perform a background check that provides confidential information to the White House about the character and integrity of the nominee. In a criminal probe, FBI agents offer judgments in their reports about the credibility of the people they interview. But in background investigations, or BIs as they’re called, the FBI does not provide commentary or issue judgments.

    Read more …

  • Health Care Is the Sleeper Issue of 2018

    Republicans must counter Democratic attacks on pre-existing conditions.

    Sen. Claire McCaskill speaks on health care policy on Capitol Hill, July 19.
    Sen. Claire McCaskill speaks on health care policy on Capitol Hill, July 19. PHOTO: MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES
    The Democrats’ most potent national policy issue in the 2018 midterms is health care, and it’s showing up on TV. One Arizona ad says Martha McSally, the Republican congresswoman running for Senate, “voted to gut protections for people with pre-existing conditions.” Another, in North Dakota, accuses GOP Senate nominee Kevin Kramer of “voting five times to let insurance companies deny coverage to people with conditions like cancer.”
     
    Ads like this are filling the airwaves in races for Congress and governorships. GOP candidates ignore them at their peril. There are powerful responses, but Republicans must deploy significant resources and energy for them to prevail.
     
    The pre-existing-conditions offensive against the GOP is based on its votes to repeal ObamaCare. But the truth is that Ms. McSally, Mr. Cramer and every Republican in Congress who voted for repeal also voted to require states to provide protections for people with pre-existing conditions. The GOP approach was to let each state figure out how best to accomplish this under a federal system that worked better than the Affordable Care Act. Republicans trusted leaders in state capitals to do better than Washington for the people of their states.

    Read more …

US National Debt Clock

By Eric

Come join us

Please join us to discuss current Colorado political issues from The Right Side.

The NSRF meets on the second Saturday of every month from 9:00 am-11:00 am at Amazing Grace Church, 541 E. 99th Place in Thornton . Use the north door to enter. Admission is $5 per person. Coffee, orange juice, bottled water, fruit, & pastries are included with your admission.

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