• PROMO Government - Taxes Money Calculator Word Blocks - iStock - LIgorko
    Published Friday, May 14, 2021
    by Robert Davis | The Center Square contributor

    (The Center Square) — Colorado lawmakers introduced a pair of bills this week that seek to overhaul the state’s tax code.

    House Bill 21-1311 would revise corporate tax reporting standards, limit itemized deductions, and restrict contributions to tax-savings accounts to subsidize increases to the earned income tax credit and the state’s child tax credit.

    House Bill 21-1312 would update several provisions of the state’s property tax code and also initiate a phasing-out of tax credits and exemptions for the coal industry.

    Both bills are sponsored by a Democrat coalition of Sens. Chris Hansen, D-Denver, and Dominick Moreno, D-Commerce City, and Reps. Emily Sirota, D-Denver, and Mike Weissman, D-Aurora.

    Supporters of the bills say they do three important things: increase tax fairness, close loopholes for the wealthy, and modernize the tax code.

    Scott Wasserman, president of the Bell Policy Center (BPC), a left-leaning think tank, described the bills as “important” for the structural integrity of the state budget going forward.

    “Politicians always talk about cleaning up the tax code, but this is one of the first attempts to really do it,” he said. “We have a structural budgetary deficit in this state. When is it going to be the right time to address it?”

    To read the rest of this story, please click (HERE):

  • Federal appeals court to consider future of lawsuit over Colorado’s TABOR

    The 1992 Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights requires that tax increases be approved by voters

    Two women walk up the steps on the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver, on Oct. 16, 2018. (John Ingold, The Colorado Sun)

    The Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will consider whether a long-running lawsuit challenging Colorado’s strict tax and spending limits as unconstitutional can proceed.

    Colorado Politics reports that a nine-judge panel will consider on Monday a review of the lawsuit, which was filed in 2011 by group of elected officials.

    The 1992 Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights requires that tax increases be approved by voters. It also requires the state to refund tax revenue that exceeds a figure determined by a formula based on inflation and population growth.

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

  • Colorado lawmakers introduce 2021 transportation fee bill

    Fees would raise about $3.8 billion over next 11 years, coupled with $1.5 billion from general fund

    Posted at 6:46 PM, May 04, 2021

    DENVER – State lawmakers unveiled their much-awaited transportation bill on Tuesday, saying 2021 is the year Colorado lawmakers will finally take action on such a measure after years of stalemates at the state Capitol and ballot box.

    The Democratic sponsors of the bill, SB21-260, were joined by Gov. Jared Polis, Republican State Sen. Kevin Priola of Henderson, Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers, also a Republican, and the presidents of Colorado Concern and the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, among others, to unveil the bill they first previewed in March.
    Some has changed since then, but the core of the effort remains the same: leveraging fee increases and new fees on gasoline, diesel, ride-sharing services, retail orders and electric vehicle registrations to come up with about $3.8 billion over the next 11 years and pairing that with about $1.5 billion in contributions from the general fund, for a package estimated at about $5.3 billion.
    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):
  • 9 federal judges set to decide fate of TABOR repeal lawsuit

    Hickenlooper submits his final state budget, but it may not last long
    Exactly 10 years after a group of local and state elected officials first filed a legal challenge to Colorado’s most celebrated — and vilified — constitutional provision, the entirety of the Denver-based federal appeals court will now consider whether to pull the plug on that fight.

    On Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, which hears appeals from Colorado and five surrounding states, will hold a rare all-judges hearing, known as an “en banc” review, of the lawsuit seeking to overturn the state’s Taxpayer Bill of Rights. Although appellate courts typically issue decisions in panels of three judges, the 10th Circuit in October granted en banc review of the TABOR case.

    Such hearings are highly atypical: from October 2018 through September 2019, the 10th Circuit only heard one case en banc out of more than 1,100.

    There are 12 authorized judgeships on the 10th Circuit that require presidential nomination and U.S. Senate confirmation. However, only nine judges will participate in the en banc panel: five who were nominees of Democratic presidents and four who were Republican nominees.

    The diminished number is the result of two Clinton administration appointees retiring from active status earlier this year. One of them, Senior Judge Mary Beck Briscoe, will join the en banc hearing. In addition, of the 10 remaining active judges, Scott M. Matheson Jr., a nominee of President Barack Obama, and Joel M. Carson III, a nominee of Donald Trump, have each recused themselves.

    TABOR, a 1992 constitutional amendment, limits the amount of revenue the state can collect and spend, and requires voter approval for new taxes and tax rate increases. The amendment also provided a mechanism to refund revenue collections to taxpayers in excess of a formula based on inflation and population growth. Colorado refunded nearly $3.5 billion in the quarter-century since TABOR’s passage.

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

  • Paul Lundeen
    Paul Lundeen

    There is no doubt Colorado needs to upgrade its roads and bridges. You can’t drive in El Paso County without swerving around potholes. Now that the pandemic appears to have crossed a tipping point, wait times are building again to get from Colorado Springs to Denver.

    The fact that Colorado legislators are paying attention to our infrastructure problems should be a win. But SB 260 is more about building government than building roads.

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

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    • Debate over North Carolina’s recently proposed Taxpayer Bill of Rights will begin heating up soon
    • Opponents will likely try to portray Colorado’s experience in a negative light, to serve as a warning
    • Their major claims, however, are easily debunked

    North Carolina legislators recently filed a bill that would enable voters to decide if a Taxpayer Bill of Rights should be added to the state constitution.

    The main feature of a Taxpayer Bill of Rights is that it would limit the annual growth rate of the state budget to a rate tied to inflation plus population growth. Other provisions would require voter approval of tax increases and mandate that excess revenue collections be used to bolster the state’s Rainy Day fund and refunded back to taxpayers.

    The benefits of a Taxpayer Bill of Rights are many, most notable in that it would make permanent the fiscal restraint that conservative lawmakers have exercised over the last decade. Common-sense restraints on spending can smooth out spending cycles, better prepare the state for economic downturns, and enable tax cuts to make North Carolina more competitive for investment and job growth.

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

  • The Title Board reconsidered its ballot titles for three property tax reduction proposals at its April 30, 2021 meeting.

    Opponents were unsuccessful at derailing three ballot initiatives that would cost local governments more than $1 billion in property tax revenue as the Title Board on Friday stuck by its original decision to award a ballot title to the measures.

    On April 21, the three-member board concluded Initiatives #26-28 contained a single subject, as the state constitution requires, and consequently set a title that would appear before voters. But objectors Carol Hedges and Scott Wasserman challenged the board’s finding, trigging a rehearing at the Title Board’s final meeting to screen proposals for the 2021 statewide ballot.

    As introduced, the initiatives would all reduce the residential property tax assessment rate from 7.15% to 6.5% and cut the assessment rate for all other property from 29% to 26.4%. Nonpartisan fiscal analysts estimated the tax cut would constitute a $1.03 billion hit to local governments, affecting services such as K-12 education and police. Because Colorado’s school financing scheme requires the state to backfill funding for local districts, there would be an extra $258 million in additional state spending each year.

    Partially offsetting the sizeable loss in local government revenue would be $25 million that the state could temporarily direct toward localities — if excess income exists that normally would be refunded under the Taxpayer Bill of Rights. The three proposed initiatives would funnel the money toward fire protection, toward reimbursements for the senior homestead tax exemption, toward general relief.

    To continue reading the rest of this story, please click (HERE):

  • April 16, 2021 By Michael Fields

    A week after the November 2020 election, I wrote a column saying that Republicans need to develop a “Contract with Colorado” based on conservative policy proposals that 55% or more of voters support. I said, “Republicans have an opportunity over the next two years to set a clear agenda and articulate it to voters.”

    After doing extensive statewide polling, certain themes really stood out. Coloradans want every citizen of our state to be allowed to flourish. They have strong opinions on issues – but want politicians to treat each other with respect and work to find common ground when they can. They are also concerned about the economy and the rising cost of living.

    In order to address some of the big issues that Coloradans care about, here are 10 ideas for the GOP to fully embrace:

    1. Continue to protect our Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights(TABOR). Few things are more popular than people being allowed to vote on any tax (or large fee) increase.
    2. Lower taxes. Coloradans overwhelmingly support a property tax cut for both residential and commercial property. With housing costs on the rise, low-income families would especially benefit from this tax cut.

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

  • The Forum is your venue to discuss current events with a 360 degree view.
    It’s your place to share solutions opposing and fighting back against progressive liberalism. This Saturday, April 10th, join us from 9:00am-11:00am MT at 1305 West 121st Avenue in Westminster as we discuss, debate, and make plans about Colorado politics.

    Admission is only $1 per person so bring a friend or two. Social distancing and masks are required due to Tri-County Health Department mandates. We’ll have bottled water for attendees.

    “Roman Forum, Latin Forum Romanum, most important forum in ancient Rome, situated on low ground between the Palatine and Capitoline hills. The Roman Forum was the scene of public meetings, law courts, and gladiatorial combats in republican times and was lined with shops and open-air markets. Under the empire, when it primarily became a centre for religious and secular spectacles and ceremonies, it was the site of many of the city’s most imposing temples and monuments.”

  • TRAIL MIX | Colorado GOP looks to past midterms for ’22 hopes

    Denver Mayor Hancock, Bob Beauprez, Ryan Call
    In this file photo from Feb. 24, 2014, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock, center, stands with former Rep. Bob Beauprez, left, and then-Colorado Republican Committee chairman Ryan Call, during a news conference to discuss a potential bid for the city to host the 2016 Republican National Convention. Denver was eliminated in the first round for the RNC, which eventually went to Cleveland, Ohio.

    The Democrats have only been in control in Washington, D.C. — occupying the White House and swinging the gavels in the House and Senate — for a little over two months, but already the political class has its eyes on next year’s midterm election.

    While President Joe Biden won’t be on the ballot in 2022, his performance will, risking the razor-thin majority the Democrats hold in the U.S. House and the party’s 50-50 strength in the Senate, which is effectively a majority because Vice President Kamala Harris can cast a tie-breaking vote.

    In Colorado, where Democrats have been in charge across the board for two years longer, Republicans are licking their chops at the chance to stage a comeback after years of diminishing clout at the ballot box and two straight cycles racking up historic losses.

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

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Come join us

Please join us to discuss current Colorado political issues from The Right Side.

The Forum meets on the second Saturday of every month from 9:00 am-11:00 am at Americans For Prosperity’s Colorado Office, 1305 West 121st Avenue, in Westminster.  Admission is $3 per person. Coffee and bottled water are included with your admission.  We’re unable to serve a continental breakfast due to COVID restrictions.

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