• The Colorado Supreme Court In Denver
    The Ralph L. Carr Colorado Judicial Center in downtown Denver, home of the Colorado Supreme Court.

    Five additional challenges to proposed ballot initiatives went to the Colorado Supreme Court this week, as opponents seek to block measures pertaining to paid leave, tax policy and the petitioning process from the November statewide ballot.

    Kelly Brough, the president and CEO of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, filed four of the challenges. She wrote in a court petition that she believed Initiative 245, which would create a right to ballot initiative at virtually every level of state and local government, had a misleading ballot title because it omitted descriptions of several key features from the complex measure.

    Specifically, she argued that the title should inform voters of a reduction in signatures required to put an initiative on the ballot, of newly-assigned jurisdiction to the Supreme Court to hear initiative protests and of prohibitions on legislation from the General Assembly on topics that voters previously rejected through referendum.

    The three-member Title Board sets the ballot titles for voters if they determine that an initiative constitutes a single subject. The title must include the central components of the proposal, but also be brief.

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

  • Increase taxes on rich, lower them for rest

    Coloradans may be voting this November on a proposal to raise billions of dollars annually by hiking taxes on the rich and using the money on schools and other, unspecified needs of a “growing population and changing economy.”

    An issue committee that calls itself Fair Tax Colorado announced Thursday that it will begin collecting signatures to place its proposal, titled Initiative 271, on the 2020 ballot. They’ll need at least 124,632 of them to qualify for the ballot.

    It would compensate for the loss in revenue from the tax cut by requiring everyone earning at least $250,000 to pay a 7% income tax rate on their federal taxable income after the first $250,000 and up to $500,000.

    Anyone earning more than $500,000 would then pay a 7.75% rate on their income above and beyond the first $500,000, and up to $1 million. Finally, for anyone earning more than $1 million, the measure proposes to tax them $67,700 plus 8.9% of all federal taxable income above and beyond the first million

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

  • A few years ago, the Hospital Provider Fee was all people were talking about at the Capitol. During that time, the media called it “Colorado’s biggest political battle.”

    While the “fee” was first created in 2009, legislators moved it outside of the General Fund (without voter approval) in 2017, meaning it wouldn’t count toward our state revenue cap under the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights. And since then, it has virtually disappeared from discussions. Nevertheless, the Hospital Provider Fee might be more relevant today than ever because it touches on two of the most important policy debates of this session: transportation funding and the “public option.”

    For background, the Hospital Provider Fee is a charge that hospitals place on patients when they stay overnight. It doesn’t show up as a line-item on your bill, but it’s there. This money is then sent to the state. Next, the state receives matching federal funds. Finally, whole amount ($1.6 billion annually) is sent back to the hospitals.

    This is one of the main ways our state budget continues to skyrocket, even as we vote down tax increases. Moving the Hospital Provider Fee outside of the General Fund allows legislators to spend an extra $600 million in brand new revenue each year. Revenue that supporters of this initiative promised would be the solution they’d been looking for to fix our roads, especially in rural Colorado.

    To continue reading this article, please click (HERE):

  • Due to coronovirus concerns, we are canceling Saturday’s NSRF meeting with Michael Fields. We hope to reschedule him for another time. Stay safe NSRF members .

    Who is Colorado Rising Action?
    What do they do?
    What’s the difference between a “Tax” and a “Fee”?

    You might be surprised.
    Michael Fields will explain.
    He also helped Colorado defeat Proposition CC, which preserved your TABOR rights & refunds.

    Join us this Saturday morning, March 14th, from 9:00am-11:00am at the Amazing Grace Community Church, 541 E 99th Place in Thornton.

    Admission is $5 and includes a continental breakfast.

     

    Holding Colorado Liberals and their special interest groups Accountable.

    Michael Fields on Cory Gardner & President Trump in 2020

    Michael Fields talks about Cory Gardner and what he’ll face this year on Colorado Inside Out.

    Bernie Sanders’ Agenda Will Put 90,000 Coloradans Out of Work

    At a rally in Colorado, Bernie Sanders’ discussed his anti-energy agenda which would put 90,000 Coloradans out of work.

    COLORADO RISING ACTION

    Colorado Rising Action is focused on holding liberal groups and their special interest networks accountable and advancing conservative principles. We’re fighting for limited government, lowering taxes, fighting government over-regulation that stifles freedom, free enterprise, a strong national security, and shaping the public policy debate in the Centennial State.

    Colorado Rising Action is a 501(c)(4) organization focused on holding liberal groups and their special interest networks accountable and advancing conservative principles. We’re fighting for limited government, lowering taxes, fighting government over-regulation that stifles freedom, affordable and accessible health care, free enterprise, and a strong national security.

    We hold liberal groups and their special interest networks accountable, fact-check left-wing politicians whose policies would push our nation in the wrong direction, and ensure citizens have the most accurate, up-to-date information to drive a balanced policy conversation on national issues.

    Here’s how we do it:

    We have eyes and ears on the ground in Colorado tracking liberal special interest groups and candidates for federal office.

    Not only are we keeping track of what left-wing politicians are saying now, we also keep a fact-checking record and hold politicians accountable.

    Rapid Response. Timing is everything. We’ll be communicating in real time with reporters and directly with Coloradans with the latest and more relevant information.

    Michael Fields

    Executive Director

    Michael was previously the Senior Director of Issue Education for Americans For Prosperity (AFP), and State Director of AFP Colorado. He brings years of educational, legislative, grassroots organizing, and nonprofit experience. He has also served as a policy aide at the Colorado State House, press aide for the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions, and taught both elementary and middle school in Aurora. Michael graduated from Valparaiso University and earned his J.D. from University of Colorado – Boulder. He and his wife, Mele, and their three children live in Parker.

    Lindsey Singer

    Communications Director

    Lindsey grew up in Boulder and has 10 years of communications and public relations experience, and has worked for nonprofit organizations, diplomatic office, and political offices on the local, state and federal levels. Prior to joining Colorado Rising Action, Lindsey was the communications director for the Montana Legislature’s Republican leadership, working directly under the Speaker of the House. She also served as the state press secretary for Montana’s U.S. Senator Steve Daines. Lindsey attended the University of Colorado – Boulder and Quinnipiac University. She lives in Highlands Ranch with her fiance.

    https://coloradorisingaction.org/

  • CALDARA | Pending ballot proposals lean to the left of even our left-leaning legislature

    Jon Caldara
    Jon Caldara

    While pushing her bill to end the death penalty through the legislature, state Rep. Jeni Arndt refused to let the issue go to a public vote, you know, where you and I would have a direct say on it.

    Why? Because, as she said, “We (legislators) are the people.”

    Funny. I was taught that we the people were the people. But I went to an underfunded Catholic school, so I probably got it wrong.

    This kind of legislative arrogance makes us Coloradans love our right to the citizens initiative. The Colorado Constitution is very clear — we, the non-elected citizens of Colorado, can also act as the legislature, equally empowered to change the law, change the state constitution, even.

    In retort to Arndt, you got it wrong. We people are the legislature, not the other way around

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

  • Dear Friends,

    This is a fascinating (and disturbing) read.  One of the best “nutshell” descriptions of the United States current political situation that I’ve seen.

    Summary of eRumor:
    Shortly before his death, Eastern Michigan University professor Jack Minizey wrote about a modern civil war bing fought without guns in a column that has gone viral.

    The Truth:
    Jack Minzey was indeed an emeritus professor at Eastern Michigan University. He also died on April 8, 2018, as the forwarded email claims. Minzey did not, however, write a commentary titled “This Civil War” that’s been attributed to him.
    Daniel Greenfield wrote a delivered the commentary during the South Carolina Tea Party Convention Speech in January 2018. The original is titled, “The Second Civil War,” and mirrors the version later attributed to Jack Minzey word-for-word.

    Shortly after his death in April 2018, the commentary was attributed to Minzey in forwarded emails. Zero Hedge, a blog site that publishes conspiracy-minded commentaries about financial markets and globalization, published one version of the email that included this dramatic intro:

    Recently Jack Minzey sent what was to be the final chapter in the long line of books at treatises which he had written. Jack passed away Sunday, 8 April 2018. Professionally, Jack was head of the Department of Education at Eastern Michigan University as well as a prolific author of numerous books, most of which were on the topic of education and the government role therein. This is the last of his works.

    The Civil War commentary goes on to describe a “modern civil war” that’s being fought without guns (for now). Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, the commentary goes, is a sign of Democrats rejecting the results of an election. “It means they don’t believe that transfers of power in this country are determined by elections. That’s a civil war.”
    It’s unclear how the Civil War commentary came to be attributed to Minzey. It could have been done so accidentally. Or, it could have been done to lend more credibility, and dramatic effect, the commentary. Either way, Minzey did not write it.

    Here’s the email:

    Dr. Jack Devere Minzey, born 6 October 1928, died 8 April 2018, was the Department Head of Education at Eastern Michigan University as well as a prolific author of numerous books, most of which were on the topic of Education and the Government role therein. (Editor’s note)This was the last of his works:

    Civil War:  How do civil wars happen?  By Dr. Jack Devere Minzey

    Two or more sides disagree on who runs the country.  And they can’t settle the question through elections because they don’t even agree that elections are how you decide who’s in charge.  That’s the basic issue here.  Who decides who runs the country? When you hate each other but accept the election results, you have a country.  When you stop accepting election results, you have a countdown to a civil war. 

    Read more …

    • Jon Caldara
    • Feb 9, 2020

    Jon Caldara

    Last year we witnessed the most progressive legislative session in Colorado history. If tradition is any predictor, this legislative session should be a much milder affair.

    Election-year sessions tend to be less controversial. Legislators don’t want to overstep and risk looking extreme going into their re-election.

    Well, that’s how it used to be, at least. Not anymore.

    In case your subconscious has blocked your memory of what happened last year, like a trauma victim forgets the details of the vicious attack, let me walk you through your PTSD.

    In the 2019 legislative session our progressive overlords gave our precious nine, soon to be 10, Electoral College votes to urban centers like Los Angeles and New York with the National Popular Vote.

    They empowered the governor of California to decide what cars and trucks can be sold in Colorado (you read that right), under Cali’s emission standards.

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

     

  • Apr 11:   Karen Kataline/radio talk-show host

    Apr 18:  Colorado Republican State Assembly & Convention FirstBank Center/Broomfield

    Apr 25:  Adams County Republicans Lincoln/Reagan Dinner

    May 9:   Mandy Connell/radio talk show host

    Jun 13:  Laura Carno/FASTER Colorado

    Jun 30:  Colorado Primary election

  • Join us on to hear from Adam Johnson & Kelly Maher as they explain CaucusRoom. Plus, you’ll be able to meet Phil Covarrubias, former HD-56 Representative, who is running for Adams County Commissioner.

    We meet on Saturday February 8th from 9:00am-11:00am at Amazing Grace Community Church, 541 E 99th Place in Thornton. Admission is $5 with a continental breakfast included.

    Please share this information with your circle of influence and bring a friend or two.

    CaucusRoom is a community for conservatives to gather, network, encourage, and mobilize locally.

    https://www.caucusroom.com/

     You are not alone.

    Did you know there are many conservatives in your neighborhood? It’s easy, after spending time on many social media platforms, to feel alone. But the truth is, there are people who believe in rugged individualism, limited government and free enterprise living in every neighborhood in this country. CaucusRoom is a place for those people to find each other and make a difference.

     Community Values

    CaucusRoom is a community of registered voters who believe in and honor the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Members of CaucusRoom will inform each other, discuss issues they care about, debate policy solutions, and coalesce around political candidates and causes that best represent their values.

     

  • The Colorado State Capitol Building on Jan. 19, 2019. (Eric Lubbers, The Colorado Sun)

    The lawmakers on the Joint Budget Committee will hear public testimony Monday on the spending bill for the next fiscal year

US National Debt Clock

Come join us

Please join us to discuss current Colorado political issues from The Right Side.

The NSRF meets on the second Saturday of every month from 9:00 am-11:00 am at Amazing Grace Church, 541 E. 99th Place in Thornton . Use the north door to enter. Admission is $5 per person. Coffee, orange juice, bottled water, fruit, & pastries are included with your admission.

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