• Senate Republicans
    Scott Franz
    /
    Capitol Coverage
    Amendment 78 would give state lawmakers more power over spending decisions, including how to spend emergency aid from the federal government.

    Colorado Republicans spent this past legislative session trying to strip Gov. Jared Polis of the broad emergency powers he has been using to lead the state through the pandemic. The effort did not gain any traction in a Capitol dominated by Polis’ fellow Democrats.

    Amendment 78 is a new, conservative-led effort to make the executive branch a little less powerful by giving state lawmakers more control over emergency spending.

    It also aims to give the Colorado legislature final say in other spending decisions that are currently handled by the governor and other branches of government.

    Supporters point to an incident last spring as the reason such a change is needed.

    On May 18, with a stroke of a pen and an evening email, Polis announced he was signing an executive order spending $1 billion of federal coronavirus relief on the state’s public schools.

    The sudden announcement enraged Republican lawmakers, and even annoyed some Democrats, who felt they should have a say in how to spend so much money. People pushing Amendment 78 still haven’t gotten over it.

    There’s more to read with this story.  Please click (HERE) to continue

  • Please join us to discuss current Colorado political issues from The Right Side.

    Retired Army Major General Joseph Arbuckle enlisted in 1968 and graduated from Officer Candidate School in 1970. After returning from Vietnam, he distinguished himself as one of the Army’s missile maintenance experts as well as being noted for his skill in logistics.

    His work greatly improved the Army’s logistical capability and flexibility leading up to Operation Desert Storm and beyond it.
    He retired in 2000 after 31 years of service having served in many Army command, policy and logistical positions.

    He founded Flag Officers For America in 2020 to mobilize other patriotic retired officers in an effort to preserve and strengthen the Republic by influencing public policy and opinion.

    Decorated Army Major Joseph Arbuckle has been slammed after signing a letter that called President Joe Biden’s mental health into question. Major Arbuckle was one of the around 124 signatories to the controversial letter, published by a group known as ‘Flag Officers 4 America’ on Wednesday, May 12.

    ‘We must speak out in order to be faithful to our oath to support and defend the Constitution’ the retired Major said in defense of the letter that became public.

    Hear his thoughts on this and many other issues affecting America.

    We meet on Saturday, October 9th, from 9:00am-11:00am at Nancy Paul’s home, 11611 Shoshone Way, in Westminster. Admission is $3 per person.
    As always, any candidate or group who attends our meetings are given time to address members of The Forum.

    To receive our monthly newsletter, send an email with the word “subscribe” in the subject line to: info@northsuburbanrepublicanforum.com.

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  • Commission submits final congressional district map to state Supreme Court for approval

    Colorado Congressional District Map
    Colorado Independent Congressional Redistricting Commission’s final draft of new congressional district map

    (The Center Square) – Colorado’s Independent Congressional Redistricting Commission (ICRC) approved the final draft of the state’s new congressional district map during a late-night vote on Tuesday evening.

    The map will now head to the state Supreme Court for final approval. A decision is expected no later than Nov. 1.

    The 12-member commission approved the map by an 11-1 margin. It received three votes in favor from Democrats, four votes from Republicans, and four votes from unaffiliated members of the commission.

    Simon Tafoya, a Democrat from Denver, was the lone “no” vote.

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

     

  • FILE - Colorado Election 2020
    A lone voter casts his ballot amid voting stations set up in the McNichols building Friday, Oct. 30, 2020, in downtown Denver.

    Amendment 78 would transfer the power to appropriate custodial funds (state revenue not generated through taxes) from the state treasurer to the state legislature.

    Plaintiffs alleged that the amendment is not substantially related to Colorado’s Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) and therefore should not appear on the 2021 ballot. Measures that can go on the ballot during odd years in Colorado are limited to topics that concern taxes or state fiscal matters arising under TABOR. This requirement was added to state law in 1994. The Colorado Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) requires voter approval for all new taxes, tax rate increases, extensions of expiring taxes, mill levy increases, valuation for property assessment increases, or tax policy changes resulting in increased tax revenue. TABOR limits the amount of money the state of Colorado can take in and spend. It ties the annual increase for some state revenue to inflation plus the percentage change in state population. Any money collected above this limit is refunded to taxpayers unless the voters allow the state to spend it

    To continue reading this story, please click (HERE):

      •  Updated 

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    The Colorado State Capitol building during the final day of the legislative session on Tuesday, June 8, 2021 in Denver, Colo. (Katie Klann/The Gazette)
    It seems like just yesterday to us that Colorado voters adopted the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights on the statewide ballot and ensconced it into the state’s constitution. Yet, the groundbreaking policy has been in effect for nearly three decades.

    In that time, it has kept state and local government on a diet — and has saved taxpayers untold millions of dollars. And they still love it after all these years, as most credible polls show.

    Perhaps more noteworthy: Even some political leaders on the center-left seem to have made their peace with the policy. Our reputedly liberal Democratic governor from Boulder went so far as to laud it just the other day. That’s quite a stride.

    Best known by its acronym “TABOR,” it was bitterly opposed by the political establishment — a number of Republicans as well as most Democrats — at the time of its passage in 1992. It is still resented by left-leaning interest groups for its infringement, as they see it, on their ability to lobby for more and bigger government programs. And plenty of elected officials of every stripe continue to chafe at its restraints on their power over the public purse. A federal lawsuit against the constitutional amendment filed by some liberal stakeholders continues to crawl along.

    Yet, TABOR’s basic premise has always made perfect sense to the general public. It requires voter approval for any tax hike at any level of government in the state. And it set limits on the rate at which government budgets can grow. Any increase in tax revenue that exceeds the rates of growth plus inflation in a given year have to be returned to taxpayers. Elected leaders can keep the overage if they first ask voters’ permission.

    Curbed by unfriendly courts; artfully dodged by policy makers who have figured out clever and disingenuous end runs, TABOR doesn’t have the impact it could have — and never was the bogeyman its detractors made it out to be. Yet, it is still having much of its intended effect.

    Which is why Coloradans are now about to receive a tax refund, thanks to TABOR and the wisdom of an earlier generation of voters who first embraced it.

    To continue reading this Denver Gazette editorial, please click (HERE):

  • The University of Colorado regent, who is the only Republican official who holds statewide office, was expected to formally announce her bid Tuesday

    Heidi Ganahl gives a thumbs up after winning CU Regent at the Colorado Republican election night party Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, in Greenwood Village, Colo. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey)
    Republican Heidi Ganahl on Friday formed a candidate committee to run for governor of Colorado in 2022, confirming months of speculation that she would launch a bid to lead the state.

    The University of Colorado regent, who is the only Republican official who holds statewide office, was expected to formally announce her bid next week.

    “It’s time to fight for our Colorado way of life we love,” Ganahl said in a written statement to The Colorado Sun. “Coloradans agree. Look at the latest polls. For the first time in more than a decade, Colorado voters think we’re on the wrong track. Stay tuned on Tuesday for more.”

    Ganahl was elected as an at-large member of the board of regents in 2016, beating Democrat Alice Madden by 1 percentage point. She outperformed former President Donald Trump in the state by 8 percentage points that year.

    Ganahl, should she be selected as the GOP nominee, will face Democratic Gov. Jared Polis in next year’s election.

    Polis easily won election to his first term in 2018 after pouring more than $23 million of his own fortune into his campaign. Republican strategists agree that any bid to unseat the incumbent will likely be a long shot.

    To continue the rest of this story, click (HERE):

  • Members of The Forum,

    It’s almost time for “Are you ready for some football?”
    But, we like who’s going to address The Forum during our monthly meetings on the second Saturday of each month.

    Tomorrow we’re featuring candidates with local elections (City Council & School Boards) and also remembering the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the United States of America.

    • September 11: 9/11 Remembrance. Local City Council & School Board candidates with Russ Farmer, Angie Bedolla, Bill Vaughn, Karen Hoopes, Laura Boggs, and others

    We meet from 9:00am-11:00am at Nancy Paul’s home, 11611 Shoshone Way, in Westminster. Admission is $3 per person. As always, any candidate or group who attends our meetings are given time to address members of The Forum.

     

US National Debt Clock

Come join us

Please join us to discuss current Colorado political issues from The Right Side.

The Forum meets on the second Saturday of every month from 9:00 am-11:00 am at Americans For Prosperity’s Colorado Office, 1305 West 121st Avenue, in Westminster.  Admission is $3 per person. Coffee and bottled water are included with your admission.  We’re unable to serve a continental breakfast due to COVID restrictions.

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