• What Can’t Be Debated on Campus

    Pilloried for her politically incorrect views, University of Pennsylvania law professor Amy Wax asks if it’s still possible to have substantive arguments about divisive issues.

    What Can’t Be Debated on Campus
    ILLUSTRATION: JOHN CUNEO

    There is a lot of abstract talk these days on American college campuses about free speech and the values of free inquiry, with lip service paid to expansive notions of free expression and the marketplace of ideas. What I’ve learned through my recent experience of writing a controversial op-ed is that most of this talk is not worth much. It is only when people are confronted with speech they don’t like that we see whether these abstractions are real to them.

    The op-ed, which I co-authored with Larry Alexander of the University of San Diego Law School, appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer on Aug. 9 under the headline, “Paying the Price for the Breakdown of the Country’s Bourgeois Culture.” It began by listing some of the ills afflicting American society:

    Too few Americans are qualified for the jobs available. Male working-age labor-force participation is at Depression-era lows. Opioid abuse is widespread. Homicidal violence plagues inner cities. Almost half of all children are born out of wedlock, and even more are raised by single mothers. Many college students lack basic skills, and high school students rank below those from two dozen other countries.

    We then discussed the “cultural script”—a list of behavioral norms—that was almost universally endorsed between the end of World War II and the mid-1960s:

    Get married before you have children and strive to stay married for their sake. Get the education you need for gainful employment, work hard and avoid idleness. Go the extra mile for your employer or client. Be a patriot, ready to serve the country. Be neighborly, civic-minded and charitable. Avoid coarse language in public. Be respectful of authority. Eschew substance abuse and crime.

    These norms defined a concept of adult responsibility that was, we wrote, “a major contributor to the productivity, educational gains and social coherence of that period.” The fact that the “bourgeois culture” these norms embodied has broken down since the 1960s, we argued, largely explains today’s social pathologies—and re-embracing that culture would go a long way toward addressing those pathologies.

     

    Read more …

  • A big Thank You to our 3 speakers for sharing their insights and answering our members questions!  What an informative meeting!  If you weren’t there, you missed out.

     

     

     

    It’s time to discuss education and who would know better than Board of Education members!

    Class is in session starting at 9:00am this Saturday, February 10th at Amazing Grace Community Church, 541 E 99th Place in Thornton. Admission is $5 with a continental breakfast and beverage included.

    You’ll learn what’s going in with teachers, graduation rates, Common Core, finances, if education has changed with Betsy DeVos at the Department of Education, and other items. And we always save room for questions at the end.

    Our speakers will include Norm Jennings from the Adams 12 School Board, along with Roger Good, president of the Steamboat Springs School Board, and Pam Mazanec from the State Board of Education

     

     

     

     

    Roger Good
    Roger Good was past President of the School Board Member for Steamboat Springs District Re-2. Roger Good retired from a thirty-five-year career in the high tech industry where he had the opportunity to spend much if his career involved in international operations. He received his MBA degree from CSU and was recruited to serve on the advisory board to the business college in 1995. Since then, Roger has remained very active in education related activities for the past twenty years including serving on the Steamboat Springs granting organization that provides funding to multiple local school districts and community groups that support educational opportunities for k-12 students.
    Currently Roger is a member of the BEST (Building Excellent Schools Today )Board and he is also a member of the PACE (Professional Association of Colorado Educators) a nonunion based association for educators.
    http://www.sssd.k12.co.us/

    Adams 12 Five Star Schools is the policy-making body for the district. Its powers and duties are established in state law. The Board is comprised of five members that are elected to four-year, staggered terms. Board members may serve two consecutive terms. The district has a director district plan of representation which requires that school board members reside in a specific geographic area within the Five Star School District boundaries. Board members are elected by a vote of the electors of the entire school district. The district’s Boundary Locator provides information regarding director districts for specific addresses. Board members are not paid; they give freely of their time to serve the Five Star community.
    https://www.adams12.org/departments/board-education

    Pam Mazanec (R)

    4th Congressional District, Larkspur
    Terms of Office: January 2013 – January 2019

    4th Congressional District, Larkspur.


    Pam Mazanec was elected to the State Board of Education for the 4th Congressional District commencing January 9, 2013.

    Pam was born and raised in Colby, Kansas and went on to earn a B.A. in General Studies from Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansas. She enjoyed a career as a legal assistant in Wichita and Colorado before deciding to spend time at home with her children and actively engage in their schools. Together with her husband, Pam has been a small business owner for 15 years.

    Pam’s passion for education began during her experience serving as PTO president and volunteering in the classroom and in sports booster clubs during her children’s years in Douglas County School District. She currently serves on a School Accountability Committee and as a director of Great Choice Douglas County, a non-profit organization supporting school choice.

    Previously, Pam served as a director with the Kansas Association of Legal Assistants (KALA) and Vice President of the Colorado Paralegal Association (CPA). She is a graduate of the 2012 Leadership Program of the Rockies (LPR) and, in February 2012, was a recipient of their first “Leadership in Action” Award for her support of the Choice Scholarship Program in Douglas County.

    Pam is passionate about school choice. She supports allowing parents to direct education funds to the school that best fits their child’s needs, whether public or private. She is also a supporter of ongoing innovations in charter schools, magnet schools, online schools, schools of innovation, and homeschooling. Pam understands that a well-educated citizenry is vital to Colorado’s economic future and America’s national security. She is dedicated to seeing all Colorado children succeed and understands the critical role that education plays in their success. She is also interested in improving civics education and the wise management of taxpayer dollars.

    Pam and her husband of more than 30 years, Leon, have lived near Larkspur for 25 years, where they raised two children. They enjoy celebrating events with their very large families and camping on horseback.

    https://www.cde.state.co.us/cdeboard/pam_mazanec

     

  • Newt Gingrich: Here’s my strategy for keeping a House Republican majority in November

     By Newt Gingrich | Fox News

    Newt Gingrich: Trump needs to stay on message after SOTU

    Fox News contributor on what’s next after the ‘successful’ speech.

    On Wednesday, I was honored to speak at the Winter Meeting of the Republican National Committee about the how important and impactful the 2018 elections could be for America. Below is an excerpt of my remarks.

    Let me thank all of you, particularly those I was just chatting with, for your generosity. I have been active in the Republican Party a fairly long time, longer than the younger people here have been alive. And I want to talk to you from the heart. When Ronna and I talked about coming by, I think it was precisely because I had enough distance to look at these things and to be involved on a number of occasions.

    First of all, I thought last night’s State of the Union rivaled anything that Ronald Reagan did. It was just astonishingly effective. President Trump found specific individuals whose stories weren’t just important as wonderful human stories, but they each illustrated a part of the American tapestry in the American culture in a way that reminded all of us America is such a wonderful country.  I thought it was a very powerful and very effective speech. Read more …

  • Americans for Prosperity offer ‘Road to Freedom’ to Colorado lawmakers

    Author: Joey Bunch – January 17, 2018 – Updated: 19 hours ago

    Americans for Prosperity(Courtesy of Americans for Prosperity)

    You won’t find Bob Hope or Bing Crosby but Americans for Prosperity are urging Colorado lawmakers to take the “Road to Freedom,” the conservative organization’s legislative agenda.

    Colorado Politics scored an early review of the AFP’s positions on energy, education, transportation and the  Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights.

    You can read the document by clicking here.

    “We made great strides in 2017 defending TABOR and advancing policies that promote economic freedom,” Jesse Mallory, AFP’s state director and the former Colorado Senate Republicans’ chief of staff, said in a statement.

    Read more …

  • Colorado Senate Republicans will introduce road-bonding bill on Legislature’s 1st day

    By  –  Reporter, Denver Business Journal

    Not content just to say that Colorado transportation funding is their top priority, state Senate Republicans will introduce a bill on the opening day of the legislative session Wednesday that seeks bonding voter approval for as much as a $3.5 billion bond sale, Senate President Kevin Grantham said today.

    Similar measures have died in the state Legislature for three years in a row, but the financial situation this year is very different.

    Because of the improving economy and federal tax reform, Colorado is expected to bring in as much as $1 billion more in uncommitted funds between this current fiscal year and the fiscal year that begins on Jan. 1 — and Grantham said a significant portion of that money should be going toward the $9 billion backlog in transportation needs that the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) projects over the next 10 years.

    Gov. John Hickenlooper on Wednesday asked the Joint Budget Committee to add $148.2 million to next year’s general-fund budget specifically for transportation needs.

    Senate Majority Leader Chris Holbert, R-Parker, said today that he was grateful to the governor and his budget director, Henry Sobanet, for the request, but believes that the Legislature should put closer to $300 million toward roads next year and each year thereafter. That commitment of $300 million would allow for bonding of $3 billion to $3.5 billion, if Colorado voters were to approve the bond sale at the November ballot.

    Legislative Republicans have talked generally about increasing the amount of transportation funding in the ballot, but today was the first time that Senate leaders offered specific details about their plans.

     

    Read more …

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Please join us to discuss current Colorado political issues from The Right Side.

The NSRF meets on the second Saturday of every month from 9:00 am-11:00 am at Amazing Grace Church, 541 E. 99th Place in Thornton . Use the north door to enter. Admission is $5 per person. Coffee, orange juice, bottled water, fruit, & pastries are included with your admission.

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