• Civil War

    How do civil wars happen?

    Two or more sides disagree on who runs the country. In addition, they cannot settle the question through elections because they do not even agree that elections are how you decide who is in charge.

    That is the basic issue here.

    Who decides who runs the country? When you hate each other but accept the election results, you have a country. When you stop accepting election results, you have a countdown to a civil war.

    The Mueller investigation is about removing President Trump from office and overturning the results of an election.  We all know that. However, it is not the first time they have done this.

    The first time a Republican president was elected this century, they said he did not really win. The Supreme Court gave him the election. There is a pattern here.

    What do sure odds of the Democrats rejecting the next Republican president really mean? It means they do not accept the results of any election that they do not win. It means they do not believe that transfers of power in this country are determined by elections.

    That is a civil war.

    There is no shooting. At least not unless you count the attempt to kill a bunch of Republicans at a charity baseball game practice. However, the Democrats have rejected our system of government.

    This is not dissent.

    It is not disagreement. Read more …

  • The 8 who would be governor: Candidates square off at CoPo/Gazette forum

    Author: Ernest Luning – May 19, 2018 – Updated: 3 hours ago

    The Republican candidates for governor talk on a panel at an annual Colorado Civic Barbecue at the Garden Pavilion at Penrose House on Saturday May 19, 2018 in Colorado Springs. (Photo by Dougal Brownlie, The Gazette).

    For the first time, all four Republicans and four Democrats running for governor of Colorado squared off during a pair of debates Saturday in Colorado Springs, discussing policies ranging from transportation funding to gun violence, taxes to President Donald Trump.

    The candidate forum was presented by Colorado Politics, The Gazette and El Pomar’s Forum for Civic Advancement.

    Disagreements among members of the same party were few, and sparks only flew a couple of times during the exchanges, which took place just over two weeks before voters start receiving primary ballots in the mail — although the differences between the two parties were stark.

    The two 90-minute debates bookended the inaugural Colorado Civic Barbecue, a chance for several hundred members of the community to rub shoulders and listen to live bluegrass music between the doubleheader at the historic Penrose House near The Broadmoor hotel.

    Read more …

  •  

    Give a few bucks to help out the good folks looking into Boulder’s anti-gun funny business. They need funds for an open-records request the city doesn’t want them to see.


    On April 5, 2018, Boulder City Council passed its first reading of a ban on nearly every semi automatic firearm in city limits. The ban also includes bump stocks and all magazines that hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition.

    Despite more than 80 percent of the people who spoke that night opposed to the ban, city council then passed the ordinance on second reading on May 1.

    If this ordinance passes third reading, all owners of banned weapons will be required to obtain a certificate of ownership from the Boulder Police Department or surrender their weapon(s). No new purchases or possession will be allowed in the city limits.

    All bump stocks and magazines that hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition will be required to be surrendered to the police.

    The only exceptions to the ban are for active law enforcement, military or anyone possessing a federal firearms license.

    I have already organized several successful Rally for Our Rights protests including one in Boulder, which brought out more than 500 people in the snow for a peaceful demonstration in defense of our right to keep and bear arms.

    However, my work is not done. I have good reason to believe that Moms Demand Action and several of the Boulder City Council members have violated open meetings laws to conspire on this ordinance, as well as possible other violations in their efforts to take away your rights under the United States Constitution.

    Because of that, I filed a Colorado Open Records Act (CORA) request for emails between city elected officials, certain city employees and Moms Demand Action leaders.

    The city of Boulder wants more than $1,200 to fill that request. I believe this is a stall tactic and a way to discourage me from getting at the truth. As a single mom fighting for my children’s future, this level of financing to keep all our rights in tact is out of control on the part of the city of Boulder.

    So I am asking for your help in funding my cause to get access to those emails and to keep fighting the fight down the road, as I’m sure more expenses like this one will pop up.

    Please donate what you can any little bit helps.

    Leslie Hollywood

    The Second Amendment Transparency Project

  • From Parkland to Waffle House

    Society ‘dropped the ball’ on Nikolas Cruz and Travis Reinking. A hero picked it up.

    After the shooting in Nashville, April 22.
    After the shooting in Nashville, April 22. PHOTO: MARK HUMPHREY/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    The death toll at a Nashville Waffle House stopped at four because James Shaw pushed back.

    Mr. Shaw ran toward shooter Travis Reinking out of an instinct for self-protection. “I acted in a blink of a second,” he says. “It was like: ‘Do it now. Go now.’ I just took off.”

    He says he’s no hero, but men have been awarded the Medal of Honor for acting on the same blink-of-an-eye instinct. Mr. Shaw is not only a hero, but an object lesson in what America once took for granted but no longer does.

    Over a long time, going back decades, the opposite instinct became the norm in the United States when confronted with threats.

    The threats could be large, like school shootings and terrorism, or they could be small, daily assaults on the most basic civilized orderings of everyday life. Such as 14-year-old girls using four-letter words.

    We used to push back instinctively. Then, we routinely began to step aside.

    The new instinct—don’t do it—happened for all sorts of reasons: You’ll get in trouble with the lawyers. Somebody else is supposed to take care of these things. There must be a better way to understand this problem. Eventually, the simple answer of a James Shaw—“Do it now!”—just died.

    That may be changing. There is evidence that people in positions of social authority are rediscovering the value of pushback.

    On the same day the Waffle House shooting happened, The Wall Street Journal published a story with the headline “Schools Take Zero-Tolerance Approach to Threats After Parkland Shooting.”

    It reported that school officials around the country “are warning parents and students in memos, community meetings and school assemblies that language perceived as threatening, even done in jest, could land younger students in juvenile detention centers and older ones in jail with criminal records.”

    You read that right. Forget the chat in the school counselor’s office. Your next talk will be with the folks at the precinct house. The squad car is waiting at the schoolhouse door.

    A return to the 1940s? We could do worse. And you know that we have when the only solution left is turning schools into armed sentry posts.

    A prosecutor in Macomb County, Mich., said: “If you threaten a school, you are going to be charged.” Beyond common sense, the reason is astonishing: Since the February Parkland shooting, 54 students in Michigan have been charged for making threats against schools.

    Up to now, apparently, you could shoot your mouth off like this—threatening classmates or the entire school—and get off with what in our times has become the one-size-fits-all excuse: “What’s your problem? I was kidding.

    Amy Klinger of the Educator’s School Safety Network told the Journal, “There are kids being arrested today that would have not gotten arrested for the same thing in January. We have come to some sort of place where people realize you can‘t say that stuff.”

    After decades of social mayhem, we have indeed come to some sort of place. Better late than never.

    Pushback is a social virtue. Its utility is a society’s self-preservation. Pushback from people in positions of authority—school principals, university presidents, the cops, parents—has always been the ballast against disorder in a free society.

    If you stepped over a line—and a general consensus once existed on where those lines were—a small personal price was paid, if only in embarrassment for one’s parents. (Please, no false analogies to Maoist social-media shaming.)

    That consensus fell apart. In the 1980s, sophisticates laughed at First Lady Nancy Reagan’s antidrug slogan, “Just say no.” She was defending a broader social attitude. She lost.

    Similarly in schools, the opponents of pushback theory discovered a remarkable weapon: the Supreme Court. Proponents of standing aside turned decades of school disciplinary tradition into constitutional issues. They won.

    In a series of decisions, the justices made the disciplinary authority of principals legally complicated. Fearful of triggering expensive litigation, school authorities pulled back. The environment for learning degraded and remains so to this day in both good and poor public schools.

    The No. 1 reason inner-city parents give for trying to get their children into charter or parochial schools is safety, to escape the chaos and danger of the public schools.

    In 2007 the Supreme Court recognized what had happened, and ruled in the “Bong Hits 4 Jesus” case (Morse v. Frederick) that principals could tell a student advocating illegal drug use near the school to shut up. In his concurrence, Justice Stephen Breyer wrote, “Students will test the limits of acceptable behavior in myriad ways better known to schoolteachers than to judges.” So we learned.

    The phrase used to explain killers Travis Reinking and Nikolas Cruz is that authorities “dropped the ball.” This week, James Shaw picked up the ball inside a Waffle House. It’s time for the people in charge of our institutions to start doing the same thing.

    Write henninger@wsj.com.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/from-parkland-to-waffle-house-1524696345?mod=djemMER

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