• Read more …

  • Colorado to Address Unfinished Business From Civil War

    Voters will consider changing state constitution to abolish all forms of slavery

    An 1876 copy of the Colorado state constitution.
    An 1876 copy of the Colorado state constitution. PHOTO: P. SOLOMON BANDA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Colorado voters will decide in November on an issue that most people think was settled with the Civil War: the abolition of slavery.
     
    The 13th amendment of the U.S. Constitution abolished most forms of slavery when it was ratified in 1865. But it allowed for slavery or involuntary servitude as a “punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted.”
     
    Colorado voters will consider a proposed change to the state constitution that would shorten Section 26 of Article II to read, “There shall never be in this state either slavery or involuntary servitude.” The Nov. 6 ballot proposal, known as Amendment A, requires a simple majority to pass.
     
    Twenty-two other states have similar provisions in their constitutions allowing slavery or involuntary servitude for those who committed crimes, while most others make no mention of slavery. Rhode Island is the only state that prohibits slavery in all instances.
     
    Colorado could be the first state to abolish slavery by amending its state constitution, said Nathan Woodliff-Stanley, executive director of the ACLU of Colorado.

    Read more …

  • Who’s Attacking Political Norms Now?

    Democrats target the ‘legitimacy’ of the Supreme Court.

    Senators Cory Booker and Kamala Harris at a Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Sept. 28.
    Senators Cory Booker and Kamala Harris at a Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Sept. 28. PHOTO: AARON P. BERNSTEIN/BLOOMBERG NEWS
    After the extraordinary tumult of Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings ended, three normal things happened that are embedded in this country’s Constitution and traditions.
     
    The full Senate voted on the nomination, and Judge Kavanaugh was confirmed. Then Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts swore in Mr. Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice. Last Tuesday Justice Kavanaugh, sitting as the most junior Justice next to Justice Elena Kagan, participated in oral arguments in two cases involving the Armed Career Criminal Act.
     
    For Democrats, this return to normalcy is intolerable. They are doubling down on their war against the new Justice.
     
    They have several related goals: Undermine Justice Kavanaugh’s authority on the Court, argue that his presence undermines the legitimacy of the Supreme Court itself, drive Justice Kavanaugh off the Court through impeachment if they win control of the House of Representatives, and, most fantastic of all, consider expanding the size of the Court if they regain control of the government.
     
    At his political rallies, President Trump has taken to calling out “the radical Democrats.” Democrats are appalled at the President’s rhetoric. We can’t imagine why. If the party’s post-confirmation campaign against Justice Kavanaugh isn’t a radical departure from the norms of American politics, we can’t imagine what is.
     
    Dianne Feinstein, speaking from her Senatorial platform on Twitter , wrote that Judge Kavanaugh’s confirmation “undermines the legitimacy of the Supreme Court.” Possibly Twitter’s character limitations prevented Senator Feinstein from explaining exactly how the legitimacy of the Court was being undermined, but the idea has taken hold among Democrats.

    Read more …

  • What if Obama Voters Remember How Lousy the Obama Era Was?

    The left worries that young people and minorities don’t hate Trump enough.

    By James Freeman

    Oct. 12, 2018 5:01 p.m. ET

    Former President Barack Obama campaigns for Democratic candidates in Pennsylvania last month. PHOTO: MATT ROURKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    During the Obama administration there was much confident chatter on the left about the “coalition of the ascendant.” This rising population of young people, social liberals and minority voters not only carried Barack Obama to two national victories but was allegedly destined by demography to exert an increasing leftward tug on American politics. The potential problem for leaders of this coalition is that along the way some of their followers may have noticed the results of their policies.

    A few warning signs have been appearing lately as the Obama generation makes it way into the workplace and as minority voters seem unwilling to hate President Donald Trump as much as Democratic politicians and the press expect them to do.

    “It’s time for some alarm about the midterms,” writes David Leonhardt of the New York Times. “The most recent polls have underscored the real possibility that Republicans will keep control of both the Senate and House.” According to Mr. Leonhardt:

    Democrats now appear highly unlikely to take back the Senate, which was always going to be hard for them, given the conservatism of the states holding Senate elections this year. And while Democrats are still favored to win the House, many races remain so close — with neither candidate yet polling above 50 percent — that they could break either way in the final weeks. It’s easy to see a scenario in which many Democratic-leaning voters fail to turn out, as often happens in the midterms, and many Republican-leaning voters remain loyal to the party.

    How could turnout possibly be a problem for Democrats, given all of the rage from professional leftists directed at Mr. Trump? Apparently amateur leftists aren’t as angry and in many cases may not even be leftists. Read more …

  • Few surprises as state candidates meet

    In Westminster forum, legislative candidates stick to their sides

    Posted 

    State legislature candidates shared views on a variety of issues during a forum hosted by the Westminster Chamber of Commerce at Covernent Village Oct. 6.

    Grady Nouis, R-Westminster, is challenging incumbent Tracy Kraft-Tharp, D-Arvada, for House District 29, which includes northeast Arvada and western Westminster.

    Bruce Baker, R-Westminster, and Shannon Bird, D-Westminster, are vying for a seat in House District 35 to be vacated Faith Winter, who is running for a state senate seat instead. The district is a sliver of Westminster mostly east of Sheridan and west of I-25 from 68th Avenue to 156th Avenue. Baker and Bird have both served on the Westminster City Council.

    Incumbent Beth Martinez Humenik, R-Thornton, is defending her seat in Senate District 24 – which includes portions of Westminster, Thornton and Northglenn – from challenger Winter, D-Westminster.

    TABOR

    Candidates were asked their opinion of the Colorado Taxpayer Bill of Rights, which limits the revenue the state can keep and spend as well as requires any tax increase to be approved by voters — rather than leaving it to legislators, according to leg.colorado.gov.

    Read more …

  • Health Care Crowds Out Jobs, Taxes in Midterm Ads

    Once mum on health care, Democrats are hammering the issue in political ads as GOP attempts to tout tax cuts and economy

    By Brian McGill and Julie Bykowicz

     Eight years ago, the newly passed Affordable Care Act was so widely criticized that it contributed to Democrats losing control of the House of Representatives. But in this midterm election, health care is the party’s most-mentioned topic in advertising—far above anything else, including opposition to President Trump.

    Meanwhile, Republicans—who have made repealing the Affordable Care Act one of their top advertising messages since the 2010 election—are barely mentioning it this year, after the GOP-led Congress tried unsuccessfully to overturn the law last year. The party has instead turned its attention to touting the tax legislation Mr. Trump signed into law late last year.

    The Wall Street Journal analyzed Kantar Media/CMAG advertising data on health care and tax and economic messaging in all House and Senate races from Jan. 1 to Sept. 30. Here is what campaign ads tell us about how the political conversation is changing.

    Health Care

    In 2010, about 29% of Republican political ads targeted the ACA while fewer than 6% of the Democrats’ ads did so—and even the Democratic messaging was split between positive and negative messages.

    In the 2014 midterms, 44% of Republican ads attacked Obamacare while 31% of Democratic ads mentioned the issue. Read more …

US National Debt Clock

By Eric

Come join us

Please join us to discuss current Colorado political issues from The Right Side.

The NSRF meets on the second Saturday of every month from 9:00 am-11:00 am at Amazing Grace Church, 541 E. 99th Place in Thornton . Use the north door to enter. Admission is $5 per person. Coffee, orange juice, bottled water, fruit, & pastries are included with your admission.

To receive our monthly newsletter, send an email with the word "subscribe" in the subject line to: info@northsuburbanrepublicanforum.com.

You can also join our Facebook Group page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/NorthSuburbanRepublicanForum/